Trenbolone low test, high tren

Trenbolone, like all anabolic steroids is a derivative of testosterone. Trenbolone is part of the 19-nor family and is…wait, should I just stop right here? Raise your hand if you have read every Trenbolone article there is that introduces the anabolic steroid just as I have begun too. I know, we know—and we do not care. What we want to learn is something new about Trenbolone, not that it was originally used to increase muscle growth in livestock. If you didn’t know that trivia about Trenbolone, then I suggest to stop reading this text now and start with Wikipedia. In today’s blog, we are going to discuss a less talked about topic with Trenbolone.

 

We all know by now Trenbolone is notorious for being associated with side effects such as tren cough, night sweats, insomnia, irritability, vivid dreams and mood changes. If you are asking me for the randomised control trials, I do not have it—no one does. Trenbolone was innovated for animals, not humans. That fact alone makes Trenbolone a daring compound. Thanks to the internet though, there have been thousands upon thousands of similar anecdotal reports of these common side effects with Trenbolone, so there is little doubt in my opinion that at least something unique is going on with this orange looking oil.

 

Famous neuro-endocrinologist, Robert Sapolsky, wrote a book called ‘Behave’ which was an introduction to neuroendocrinology for the layman. A book eloquently wrote on all of the known factors involved in what makes us tick, happy, sad, angry, hungry, horny, love and hate—or kill. Of course, hormones come up a lot in the book and there is one particular chapter that explains the role sex hormones have with notion to behaviour. What the reader learns after reading this is that these sex hormones work in a synergistic manner, not alone. What does this mean? Well, you will hear about it that testosterone and the resulting androgens are responsible for aggression and competition and then estrogen is responsible for the ‘softer’ emotions—a black and white way of looking at it. How wrong these dogmatic belief patterns are. Turns out, estrogen is a crucial hormone in mediating aggression too. We need to stop looking at these sex hormones as a personality and rather; see these hormones as a collective score that contribute to a single action or behaviour. How does all of this help us manage the side effects of Trenbolone then?

 

I was not the first to innovate the approach, but I understood what may have been going on from a brain chemistry point of view when I started receiving reports of positive experiences when Trenbolone was used with low doses of testosterone. Instead of 500 mg of testosterone per week and 500 mg of trenbolone per week—the user’s cycle would look more like 100-150 mg of testosterone per week and 500-600 mg of Trenbolone per week. I hypothesise that the reduction in side effects were due to the high levels of androgens produced by tren—not being able to synergistically cooperate or be exacerbated by higher levels of estrogen because estrogen levels had now been controlled with the lower dose of testosterone (less aromatisation). Of course, this would not reduce tren cough or some of the other side effects associated with Trenbolone use, but with particular notion to mood changes, this low test, high tren protocol seemed to be doing something good. When I ask Trenbolone users which side effect they dislike the most, almost all tell me it is the change in their mood. I have known for some to fall into deep bouts of anxiety or depression while using Trenbolone. You may be asking yourself why in the world anyone would consider Trenbolone if these side effects are potentials, but then I guess you do not understand what some users will do for the perfect physique. Trenbolone works. It is that simple. In some users, I have seen results in some users that seem to defy the laws of physics. Trenbolone is not the be all end all of anabolic steroids though. Some users do not receive these mysterious physique enhancing benefits from Trenbolone, just as some users do not experience the negative side effects from Trenbolone either. When I speak about these drugs, I am generalising. It is always important to note that pharmacological determinism is a myth and that the heterogeneity with anabolic steroid responses in humans is vast. I seem to be going off on a tangent. Let’s get back to the low test, high tren discussion.

 

A fair question is then to instead of lower the dose of testosterone, we could pay particular attention to estradiol levels while using an aromatise inhibitor during the test/tren cycle. The issue with this concept is that users find it inconvenient to keep track of estradiol levels throughout a cycle and also, the test needs to be estradiol sensitive assay, not the regular immunoassay offered by pathologies in Australia. The regular immunoassay cannot accurately predict estradiol under normal conditions—and with Trenbolone the score is even further inaccurate as the immunoassay seems to pick up the Trenbolone or one of its metabolites as estradiol. This is probably why you may have seen enormous estradiol readings while using Trenbolone if you checked estradiol and did not request for the sensitive assay.

 

We do not know what is really going on with Trenbolone itself, let alone why many users are reporting successful side effect management with low test, high tren cycles. We probably won’t know for a while either. What we do know is that it seems Trenbolone is negatively affecting brain chemistry for some users who are prone—and what I think I know now is that low test, high tren cycles are at least a way to reduce some of these nasty mood changes associated with trenbolone. So perhaps give it a shot. 100 mg of testosterone per week and 400 mg of Trenbolone per week? Let me know how it goes.

 

I hope this helps! Any specific questions related to this post do not hesitate to ask in the comments section below or email us at [email protected]
– Dave from Austeroids.is

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